Monday, 28 February 2011 14:18

Focusing on the institution - Garrigues

Garrigues’ culture is very much more about the firm than the individual, say its leadership. It may have fewer stars than other firms its size, but it undoubtedly has a stronger institution.
 In the face of the global financial crisis and downturn, recent years have still been a period of growth and consolidation for DLA Piper. In Spain this has included the elevation of Managing Partner Juan Picón first to a regional and now a global leadership role. He is however now back in Madrid helping to retain the office’s focus and prepare it for what may be a challenging year ahead, he says
The past year has been one of change for Uría Menéndez in Portugal. This is evident as you approach the firm’s impressive glass-fronted Edificio Rodrigo Uría in central Lisbon, where since March 2010 the name on the building has read Uría Menéndez - Proença de Carvalho. 
Sunday, 22 August 2010 15:55

The two faces of Baker & McKenzie

The current economic situation is presenting new prospects for Baker & McKenzie in Spain believe Luis Briones and Esteban Raventós, respectively the Managing Partners of the firm's Madrid and Barcelona offices. There is now a window of opportunity within which to expand its profile among the country's major domestic businesses, they say, and they are starting by making high profile hires. The original "global" law firm, the start of the decade saw some question its cohesion, but recent years have seen renewed focus on re-applying the glue binding offices.
Gómez-Acebo & Pombo is a law firm in transition. Recent years have seen Spain’s fourth largest firm undergo radical change as it seeks to re-stake its claim to be among the country’s pre-eminent law firms. Managing Partner, Manuel Martín, suggests that while the firm may once have lost its focus, the success now being achieved stems from the consensus of opinion and unity that now characterises the partnership.
Raposo Bernardo & Associados has emerged as a new kind of internationally-minded Lisbon-based law firm, with a focus as much on developing its profile outside of Portugal as within it. The strategy appears to be working. The past year has seen it gain new market share and climb the domestic deal and ranking tables, in the face of almost unparalleled economic challenges.
Thursday, 25 February 2010 19:00

A marriage of convenience: Hogan Lovells

The start of May will see UK-based Lovells and Hogan & Hartson of the US merge to create Hogan Lovells, one of the top ten largest law firms in the world by both size and revenue. The tie-up, perceived widely in the legal sector as the first transatlantic "merger of equals" rather than a merger of necessity is, say both firms, a progressive response to the changing market and needs of multinational clients.
Wednesday, 30 December 2009 14:46

What's in a name: Cuatrecasas Gonçalves Pereira

Manuel Castelo Branco is clearly a man of patience. Almost 15 years after he first explored the possibility of creating a truly Iberian law firm, his vision was finally realised this year with the creation of Cuatrecasas Gonçalves Pereira – the name signalling the final integration of his own Lisbon-based Gonçalves Pereira, Castelo Branco & Associados (GPCB) with Spain's Cuatrecasas.
Thursday, 29 October 2009 20:00

Rising to new heights: Bird & Bird

Recently celebrating four years of operation and having recruited one of Spain's most high profile corporate personalities, Bird & Bird's Madrid office seems to be flying high.

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